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Reading and Video Resources for (IB) Psychology

The below resources are ones I have my elective and IB Psychology students reference throughout the course for additional reading and research. These are professional sites with quality summaries and/or access to original research reports.

Below the reading resources are some video playlists I compiled that give nice overviews of concepts within each of the Levels of Analyses and the option in IB Psychology. The videos are short, yet effective in helping visualize the concepts in those units.

  • THE AMERICAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION – The American Psychological Association is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States. Tons of articles and research studies on all topics related to psychology.
  • THE BRITISH PSYCHOLOGICAL SOCIETY– The British equivalent of the APA.
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL RESEARCH ON THE NET – Provides links to known experiments on the internet that are psychologically related. They are organized by general topic area with the topic areas listed chronologically with the most recently added at the top.
  • ELECTRONIC JOURNALS AND PERIODICALS IN PSYCHOLOGY – An exhaustive list of psychology journals and periodicals. These journals are where you find original reports about psychological research studies (qualitative, quantitative, secondary reviews of literature, and meta-analyses).
  • PSYBLOG – Professionally written summaries of psychological research relating to everyday life.
  • PSYCH CENTRAL – Very thorough website with news, articles, and current research and issues in psychology.
  • THE PSYCHOLOGIST – The monthly publication of the British Psychological Society.
  • PSYCHOLOGY TODAY – Popular American magazine devoted to news, stories, and research related to psychology.
  • SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN MIND – This is my favorite magazine related to psychology. Unfortunately, you only get previews of the articles here. You have to subscribe to get full access. It could be worth the subscription cost if you are thinking about majoring in psychology in university!

Biological Level of Analysis

Cognitive Level of Analysis

Sociocultural Level of Analysis

Abnormal Psychology

This post is cross-posted on the Pamoja Education Psychology Blog.

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Using Google’s 20 Percent Time Concept in My Psychology Class

Psychology is a subject area about which most students are very curious. Thus, they generate many questions about the mind and human behavior. This was very apparent in my psychology course when I surveyed the students at the beginning of semester, asking what they want to know and hope to learn. Because this course at ACS is only a semester long, we only have a short time to investigate foundational elements of psychology (I modeled this part of the curriculum after the IB Psychology syllabus by investigating Biological, Cognitive, Sociocultural, and Abnormal Psychology). However, I don’t want students to leave the course without having the opportunity to investigate answers to questions with which they came into the class. In response to this, I developed the Personal Project which incorporates Google’s 20% time concept and builds their sense of curiosity, an important habit of mind in today’s world.

This Personal Project allows the students to investigate a question they have had or pursue an intellectual curiosity related to psychology. I calculate 20% of class time (based on the number of classes we have in the semester) and set whole periods aside (at approximately two week intervals) for the students to work on the project. This semester that’s about eight 82 minute periods. Of course, some home time needs to be dedicated to this project, as well. I do provide structure and have due dates within this process, however. These are the steps I outline for students on the project overview (the project rubric is in that document, as well):

  1. Chose a topic area where you’d like your investigation to focus. (I differentiate this aspect and leave this open for the students to define a topic in which they are interested. I do provide a list of topic areas that I and previous psychology students have found interesting to help students that are stuck).
  2. Generate a research question that will guide your investigation and get it approved by the teacher. (This part of the process is very important and will drive the research the students do. I work closely with them to develop a question that will have them working higher level thinking skills, not just a summary of a topic or question that leads to a simple yes or no response).
  3. Write an annotated bibliography for at least 5 sources relevant to your research question. (I feel this is an important academic process since I can check that they are thinking deeply about the sources they are using. This is a process they will do often in university, so it’s good practice for that, as well. This part of the process is assessed as a formative task).
  4. Chose the type of product you will create to show the findings of your investigation (product possibilities: documentary style video; website, podcast, online magazine style report, VoiceThread, research report, TED talk-like formal presentation) (I differentiate the product, as well. I want the students to push creative abilities and build technology skills in this project, so I guide them to technology-based products that have strong creative elements in them. This is not an exhaustive list of possible products, however. If a student has a different product idea, they can definitely pursue that upon approval. I only allow 3 students to do a traditional research paper style product since this doesn’t really push creative abilities. They must give a good reason for wanting to do a traditional research paper. I provide links to examples of each product type so students can make an informed decision).
  5. Write an outline or storyboard that organizes your content in context of your product. (Organization and planning! This part of the process is assessed as a formative task).
  6. Create a draft of your product for feedback from a class member. (Peer editing and feedback)
  7. Submit your final product and celebrate during a show and tell! (Students that choose to do the TED style formal oral presentation do it on the due date. After those presentations, the other students share their products. Self-assessment and reflection will also occur upon completion of the product).

Students have chosen some very interesting topic areas this semester and are working well through the process so far. They are showing excitement and motivation to work on this since they are in control of what they are learning and creating. My role is as a guide, helping them work through the process, refining their understanding of the topic and related research, providing feedback, and assisting with technicalities relating to their product production.

I plan to implement this concept with my IB Geography Higher Level course in the second year of the class when we are learning the options. Students need to know three options for that course. I will facilitate two of the options, then the students will chose a third option based on their personal interest. I will structure the time and process similarly to how I’m doing it in my psychology class.

If you are using the 20% time concept, I’d love to hear your comments and how you are facilitating the process in your course!

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