I’ll Have a Big Hack with Cheese, Please

L2-world-logos-7xThe theme of this year’s Learning 2.0 conference in Manila, Philippines was “Disrupt – Rethink – Change.” There were many workshops and extended sessions that directly pertained to the processes of disrupting, rethinking, and changing. The organizers even tried something different this year by having a “Disrupt Strand” where people worked in teams to create a disruption project they could take back to implement (hopefully) at their school. I attended a couple of extended sessions that were directly about disruption. The first was called “Create a Personalized Disruption Plan” and the second was called “Hack Your School.”

Of the two extended sessions that I attended, the one that gave the most viable process was the “Hack Your School” session with John Burns. Along with giving participants time to think about hacks they could do at their schools and how they could pitch the Hackathon idea to admin, he shared the Hackathon process that he facilitated at Shekou International School in Shenzhen, China. He has delineated the process they did from start to finish on this post.

Some key takeaways and essential details from the session were:

  • All members of the community need to be engaged in the process.
  • A design framework must be used to guide the process (Agile or the Waterfall model are recommended)
  • Core hacks should be identified before a hackathon event. You can see the hacks they did at SIS here.
  • Don’t provide judgment during the process as that may slow down an idea or approach.
  • Have resources the community can access during the process. Here are the resources provided for the SIS hack.

disruptstrand1Disruption, rethinking, and changing are definitely not an easy process at any school. There are often long standing institutional processes, community expectations, other priorities or initiatives, external examination programs, and established school cultural norms that create thick barriers to disruption and change. Coupled with the transient nature of international school communities, we start to understand why disruption, and change hard, like pushing a boulder up a hill. This “Hack Your School” process, however, is one that can definitely get the disruption and change ball rolling, as it is a fair and transparent way to build community around change. Furthermore, it creates vertical and horizontal collaboration and gives greater voice to those who might not be heard otherwise. If we want to make our schools more relevant for the needs of our 21st century learner, it’s time to hack.

This posts is cross-posted here.

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About togalearning

Technology Learning Coach, High School Social Studies and online IB Psychology teacher

Posted on October 8, 2015, in Education and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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